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20130115
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
: and inaugural poet richard blanco discusses what it means to be a part of such a momentous occasion. >> brown: we have more on the fallout after lance armstrong's admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs to build his chpionship career. >> suarez: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: information trickled out today about the siege of a natural gas plant in algeria. there was word that one american hostage had been killed, but a definitive accounting of all the captives remained
will be just the fifth inaugural poet in the nation's history. richard blanco was, as he says, "made in cuba"-- he was conceived there; "assembled in spain"-- his mother gave birth to him there; and quickly "imported to the united states"-- he grew up in miami. he trained and worked as a civil engineer before turning to poetry. he's published three volumes, most recently one titled "looking for the gulf motel". blanco now lives in the small town of bethel, maine. on monday, he will become the first latino, the first openly gay, and the youngest poet to read his work at a presidential inauguration. welcome. >> thank you. >> congratulations. >> pleasure to be here. >> let me get to some of these firsts first, this inauguration say political event and it is a rare meeting of in your case politics and poetry. what do you see yourself bringing to it? ness well, i think first and foremost hopefully a great-- it is a question that had been ploting airport in the air. i would think and i would hope that i would hecht select first and foremost obviously for respect and admiration for my work. but it
republicans and democrats to both get on board. also, really special person we met. this is richard blanco. he is a 44-year-old and he is making history tomorrow. he's cuban american. he is openly gay. and he is the one to deliver the poem in the inauguration. we had a chance to talk about what it's going to be like and a little bit about the nerves. here's how he deserved cribed i me. >> writing the poem, that took weeks and that's all i did around the clock. and through the process of working with the pic and all that so once i got to d.c. on thursday, the poem was done, practiced and really since i have been here it's more about just sort of more official duties and whatnot and interviews and things like that but, you know, there's -- it's interesting because there's something to be said about the spontaneity of the art, as well. i have rehearsed the poem, looked at it several times. >> reporter: he's a little nervous. i have to admit. he admits it himself. this is the largest audience he's ever delivered a poem. he is a teacher, as well. all of his students very proud of him and he will ha
is richard blanco. he's a poet who was trained as a civil engineer because his parents insisted that writing would never take him anywhere, but he will be delivering his poetry today at the president's inauguration. and then the benediction will be delivered by luis leon, who is the rector of st. john's church, the little church right across the street from the white house. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the chairman for the inaugurational ceremonies, the honorable charles e. schumer. >> mr. president, mr. vice president, members of congress, all who are present and to all who are watching, welcome to the capitol and to this celebration of our great democracy. now, this is the 57th inauguration of an american president, and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, its simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, its meaning, that sacred and yet cautious entrusting of power from we, the people, to our chosen leader never fails to make one's heart beat faster, as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! now, we know that we would not be here today we
distinguished guest is the poet richard blanco who will share with us words he has composed for this occasion. [ applause ] >> mr. president, mr. vice president, america won today. one sun rose on us today, creeping over our shores, greeting the faces of the great lakes, spreading a simple truth across the great plains and charging across the rockies. one light waking up rooftops, under each one a story told by our silent gestures moving across windows. my faith, your faith, millions of faces in morning's mirrors, each one yawning to life, crescendoing to our day. the school buses, rhythms of traffic lights, fruit stands, oranges, begging our praise. silver trucks heavy with oil or paper, bricks or milk teaming over highways alongside us on our way to clean tables, read ledgers or save lives. to teach geometry or ring up groceries as my mother did for 20 years so i could write this poem for all of us today. all of us, as vital as the one light we move through, the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day, equations to solve, history to question or atoms imagined. the i have a dream
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)